MOBILE SOCIAL WORK

ideas, innovations and apps for social work in the age of smartphones and social media 

Mobile phone-based interventions for smoking cessation [Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009] – PubMed – NCBI

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Innovative effective smoking cessation interventions are required to appeal to those who are not accessing traditional cessation services. Mobile phones are widely used and are now well integrated into the daily lives of many, particularly young adults. Mobile phones are a potential medium for the delivery of health programmes such as smoking cessation.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether mobile phone-based interventions are effective at helping people who smoke, to quit.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, the National Research Register and the ClinicalTrials register, with no restrictions placed on language or publication date.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We included randomized or quasi-randomized trials. Participants were smokers of any age who wanted to quit. Studies were those examining any type of mobile phone-based intervention. This included any intervention aimed at mobile phone users, based around delivery via mobile phone, and using any functions or applications that can be used or sent via a mobile phone.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Information on the specified quality criteria and methodological details was extracted using a standardised form. Participants who dropped out of the trials or were lost to follow up were considered to be smoking. Meta-analysis of the included studies was undertaken using the Mantel-Haenszel Risk Ratio fixed-effect method provided that there was no evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity as assessed by the I(2) statistic. Where meta-analysis was not possible, summary and descriptive statistics are presented.

MAIN RESULTS:

Four studies were excluded as they were small non-randomized feasibility studies, and two studies were excluded because follow up was less than six months. Four trials (reported in five papers) are included: a text message programme in New Zealand; a text message programme in the UK; and an Internet and mobile phone programme involving two different groups in Norway. The different types of interventions are analysed separately. When combined by meta-analysis the text message programme trials showed a significant increase in short-term self-reported quitting (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.65). However, there was considerable heterogeneity in long-term outcomes, with the much larger trial having problems with misclassification of outcomes; therefore these data were not combined. When the data from the Internet and mobile phone programmes were pooled we found statistically significant increases in both short and long-term self-reported quitting (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.40 to 2.94).

AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS:

The current evidence shows no effect of mobile phone-based smoking cessation interventions on long-term outcome. While short-term results are positive, more rigorous studies of the long-term effects of mobile phone-based smoking cessation interventions are needed.

via Mobile phone-based interventions … [Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009] – PubMed – NCBI.

Advertisements

One comment on “Mobile phone-based interventions for smoking cessation [Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009] – PubMed – NCBI

  1. Pingback: Smoking Cessation Support By Phone: What Information Do Smokers Want? | MOBILE SOCIAL WORK

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Lutz Siemer

Lutz Siemer

Education, Research & Development in Social Work & IT After working as an alternative practitioner and psychotherapist in private practice for nearly ten years I stepped over to higher education in 2005. At Saxion University of Applied Sciences I lecture and do research and development in the area of Social Work, Psychology and IT. Currently I'm focussing on merging mobile technology and social work.

Personal Links

View Full Profile →

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Twitter

Mobile Social Work on Twitter

Facebook

Mobile Social Work on Facebook

Google+

Mobile Social Work on Google+

Tumblr

Social Mobile Work on Tumblr

RSS

Subscribe to Posts

The Fair(er) Phone:

FairPhone | A seriously cool smartphone. Putting social values first
%d bloggers like this: